Cruises

Alluring Amsterdam & Vienna (2020)

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Vienna to Amsterdam | 15 Days

Date Range: Apr 2020 - Oct 2020

Ships : River Princess

Authentic experiences and local encounters are in store on your cruise along the most scenic parts of the Main, Rhine and Danube rivers. Delight in the full spectrum of Europe’s culture, history, art, architecture, cuisine and numerous UNESCO World Heritage sites resting along some of the most legendary rivers.
Authentic experiences and local encounters are in store on your cruise along the most scenic parts of the Main, Rhine and Danube rivers. Delight in the full spectrum of Europe’s culture, history, art, architecture, cuisine and numerous UNESCO World Heritage sites resting along some of the most legendary rivers. Explore colorful Amsterdam and its abundant canals, Dutch delights and world-famous museums. Discover Germany’s splendidly quaint villages, towns, prominent landmarks, such as the Cologne Cathedral, and the region’s best wine. Sail along the scenic rivers and keep count of the castles jutting out of the landscapes. Step off your ship into fairytale-like settings where you’ll find countless opportunities for “Let’s Go” hiking, biking and walking tours from city to city. Pay a visit to the futuristic BMW factory and satiate your need for speed in Regensburg. As part of an Exclusive excursion in Dürnstein, travel to Austria’s oldest wine estate and sample some of the most exquisite wines in all of Europe. In Vienna, tag along on an exclusive “Morning with the Masters” at the Vienna Art History Museum. You’ll enjoy nothing short of a treasure trove of experiences from Amsterdam to Vienna.
Vienna to Amsterdam | 15 Days
Note: The itineraries presented are subject to modification due to water levels, closures because of public holidays or other uncontrollable factors. Every effort will be made to operate programs as planned, but changes may still be necessary throughout the cruise. This day-to-day schedule is subject to change. Your final day-to-day schedule will be provided onboard on the first day of your cruise.

Program offerings are subject to change.
DAY 1 Vienna (Embark)
Arrive at Vienna International Airport. If your cruise package includes a group arrival transfer or if you have purchased a private arrival transfer, you will be greeted by a Uniworld representative and transferred to the ship.
DAY 2 Vienna
Get ready for a myriad of exclusive-to-Uniworld excursions just waiting to be discovered in Vienna, such as a “Morning with the Masters” at the Vienna Art History Museum where the doors will open early just for you as you join an art historian for a tour, or a panoramic tour of the city’s Ringstrasse, a circular grand boulevard that surrounds Vienna’s Old Town historic district and famous monuments. The Viennese’s love for music, food, drink and grandiose architecture is abundant and evident everywhere you’ll go. Itching to encounter Vienna in an authentic way? Look no further than its beloved pubs, coffeehouses and wine taverns serving everything from Wiener Schnitzel to apple strudel to Grüner Vetliner wines. If there’s ever been a time to indulge, it’s now.

Featured Excursions:
  • The Habsburgs assembled an astonishing collection of artistic treasures over the centuries, which formed the basis for the works now on display at the Vienna Art History Museum (Kunsthistorisches). The doors open early especially for you as you join an art historian for a tour of some of the masterpieces gathered here: View a unique group of works by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Vermeer’s Allegory of Painting, Raphael’s Madonna in the Meadow, and portraits by Rembrandt, Velazquez, Rubens, Titian, Tintoretto and Van Eyck, among others, in the Picture Gallery. Then move onto the Kuntskammer galleries, where you can see Benvenuto Cellini’s legendary salt cellar (the only gold sculpture he created that has survived to the present day) and hear its remarkable story. Your exclusive tour ends with a reception in the magnificent Cupola Hall, perhaps the architectural highlight of the splendid building.

    Exclusive “Morning with the Masters” at the Vienna Art History Museum

Other Excursions:

Ring Street, the great horseshoe-shaped boulevard lined with many of the city’s major landmarks—Parliament, City Hall, the Vienna State Opera, glorious palaces and museums—is a mere 150 years old, practically an infant for a city of Vienna’s age. It replaced the walls and fortifications that had protected the city for centuries. Its construction was a testament to confidence, forward- thinking and grand urban planning, and it resulted in a 50-year building spree. You’ll pass most of these opulent landmarks on your way to the older section of the city, the area the walls once enclosed. Later, you’ll walk along Kärntner Street, the celebrated pedestrian boulevard that links the State Opera with St. Stephen’s Cathedral, past the elegant shops on the Graben and the Kohlmarkt. The neighborhood offers a lively combination of historic architecture, street performances, shoppers’ delights and true Viennese atmosphere. 

Vienna: Imperial city highlights
or

Year after year, it’s ranked as one of the most livable cities in the world. Experience Vienna as the Viennese do and you will quickly see why—it’s not just because of its beautiful architecture, peerless cultural institutions and epic history. Vienna’s a walkable city, but its public transportation is still excellent. The pleasant parks and open spaces invite outdoor activities. Its cozy coffee houses are the stuff of legend, and so are its pastries and sausage stands. Join an expert local guide for a taste of life as the Viennese live it. Walk along Ring Street, past many of Vienna’s landmark buildings: the Museum of Applied Arts, the baroque-era St. Charles Church, Musikverein (home of the Vienna Philharmonic), the Hofburg, Parliament and City Hall, on your way to Volksgarten, Vienna’s first public park (thanks to Napoleon, who blew up the bastion that had occupied the location), with its roses and fountains. Stroll along the neighboring streets, then take a break at a coffeehouse for a typical Viennese coffee. 

After your break, wander through the narrow lanes of Haarhoff, pausing in Jewish Square, with its tribute to the Austrian Jews who died during the Holocaust, before wending your way to Vienna’s oldest square, Hoher Markt, where one of the city’s quirkiest sights awaits you: At noon a Vienna Secession (as the art nouveau movement was known in Austria) clock features a parade of 12 historical figures, ranging from Marcus Aurelius to Joseph Haydn, marking the hour. While you wait for the clock show to begin, sample a classic Viennese treat, sausage, from a nearby stand. The adventure ends with yet another very typical Viennese activity—taking the subway.

You have leisure time after your tour to explore Vienna on your own. You might wish to visit the Albertina Museum, which houses one million old-master prints and an impressive collection of works by 19th- and 20th-century painters, ranging from Renoir to Rothko. If you’d like to get a little exercise and see a completely different side of Vienna, borrow a bike from the ship and explore Danube Island and Prater Park. (For a wonderful view of the region, ride the Ferris wheel in Prater Park.)

“Do as the Locals Do” Vienna walking tour
or

After your exclusive excursion, “Morning with the Masters,” see Vienna’s spooky side on a particularly mysterious tour of the city. Stroll to Heroes’ Square and solve the riddle of equestrian statues, but not before stopping in at a local café to indulge in a Bellini cocktail. Head to the Imperial Palace to learn about the straying ghosts and hauntings of this famous landmark. See the Roman excavations and structural remains of a former red-light district. Then, make your way to Graben Square and marvel at its Trinity Column, the most symbolic monument in Vienna. Head to St. Stephen’s Cathedral to decipher an encoded inscription and hear about its “magical musical structure.” Pass by the Griechenbeisl, one of the oldest Viennese inns, famous for Augustin–a regular guest and medical miracle during the black plague.

Vienna Mystery Tour
DAY 3 Vienna
Enjoy a full day of leisure in Vienna, with the choice to explore the “City of Waltzes” and dive into its vast artistic and musical legacy. The city is known for its Imperial palaces, famous residents and expansive art collections. See the highlights as you take in Old Town’s art and food, including scrumptious pastries, or discover Viennese history at the World Museum Vienna, renowned for its collection of Habsburg family treasures. Cap your day with an exclusive after-hours visit of Schönbrunn Palace and experience one of Vienna’s most popular tourist attractions after everyone else leaves. The captivating Baroque-style masterpiece reflects 300 years of changing history, styles and Habsburg monarchs. It’s a good thing you have plenty of time.

Featured Excursions:
  • Full day of leisure in Vienna
DAY 4 Dürnstein
Natural wonders of the Wachau Valley and exquisite food and wine are on the menu for your day in Dürnstein. Meander around the town’s beautiful streets lined with wildly photogenic buildings and restaurants teeming with wine produced on the outskirts of town. You won’t want to miss a sampling of the region’s most acclaimed wines at Austria’s oldest wine estate, Nikolaihof. Join a saffron workshop and get an exclusive look at the making of the spice as precious as gold.

Featured Excursions:
  • Considering its diminutive size, the village of Dürnstein offers much to explore. The famous blue baroque tower of the abbey church is doubtless its best-known landmark, but the ruined castle above the town provides its most romantic tale. There Richard the Lionheart was imprisoned until he was found by his faithful bard, Blondel, and ransom could be raised—or so the legend goes. Walk along the town’s narrow streets, past 16th-, 17th- and 18th-century houses; it’s an up-close look at over 300 years of architecture.

    Dürnstein village stroll

Other Excursions:

And there’s no better way to conclude your village stroll than with a special tasting of organic wines at Nikolaihof, perhaps the oldest winery in Austria. The location itself is fascinating: One may encounter remnants of the first buildings on the site—an ancient Roman fort—and taste wines in a deconsecrated 15th-century chapel. Owned by the Saahs family, Nikolaihof produces some of the world’s best Riesling and Veltliner varietals; in fact, the 1995 Riesling Vinothek, bottled in 2012, actually scored 100 points in The Wine Advocate, the first Austrian wine ever to rank that highly.

Exclusive Nikolaihof wine estate visit with wine tasting
or

Crusaders planted the first saffron crocuses in the Wachau Valley at the end of the 12th century, making saffron a valued crop for 700 years—but it disappeared from the terraced hillsides early in the 20th century. It wasn’t until 2007 that an ecologist found mention of it in an 18th-century document at Melk Abbey’s celebrated library. Bernard Kaar, who spent years researching the history of saffron and still more years cultivating the world’s only bio-dynamically certified saffron, is one of the Wachau’s most important producers. Meet Bernard and his wife, Alexandra, for a fascinating introduction to saffron—the plant, the spice and the cultural traditions— and educate your taste buds with flavorful delicacies as you taste red-wine-and-saffron chocolate and saffron-seasoned jams, vinegars and honey.

Saffron workshop
DAY 5 Engelhartszell, Passau
Arrive in the afternoon in the “City of Three Rivers,” Passau, where medieval lanes, tunnels, cathedrals and archways fuse with modern shopping malls and buildings. Marvel at the Italian baroque-style St. Stephen’s Church, which holds the second largest church pipe organ in the world (way to go, Passau) or set out on a panoramic tour of the city with mini hikes to the best vistas. Your afternoon brings new experiences in the forest-dotted district of Engelhartszell. Experience Bavaria’s great outdoors on a scenic bike ride along the Danube to Engelhartszell.

Featured Excursions:
  • “Let’s Go” Danube bike trail

Other Excursions:

The skyline of Passau is dominated by two buildings that owe their existence to the prince-bishops who ruled the city until 1803: the great fortress looming on a hill above the three rivers, home to the bishops until the 17th century, and the green onion domes of St. Stephan’s Cathedral. As you walk through the cobblestone streets toward those green onion domes, you’ll realize that Passau retains the layout of the medieval town. However, many of the wooden medieval buildings burned to the ground in the 17th century, and the prince-bishops imported Italian artists to build a new cathedral and a grand new residence for the bishops themselves. As a result, these splendid structures aunt Italian baroque and rococo style and ornamentation, complete with opulent gilding and wonderful frescoes. Your guide will introduce you to some of the architectural highlights—the rococo stairways of the New Residence; the cathedral; and the Town Hall, which boasts a magnificent atrium adorned by large paintings by Ferdinand Wagner—and make sure you get a close-up view of the point where the three rivers meet: The waters of each one are a different color. Because it’s built on a peninsula between the Danube and the Inn, the city has flooded often over the centuries; you can see high-water marks on many buildings (2013 saw the worst flooding in 500 years). 

Passau walking discovery tour
or Passau Panoramic tour with mini hikes
DAY 6 Regensburg
Spend the morning discovering Regensburg’s long line of dukes, kings and bishops that called the former Bavarian capital and Free Imperial City home. Regensburg boasts the largest medieval old town north of the Alps (over 1,500 listed buildings), a prominent skyline, and a large collection of museums, exhibits and theaters. Find your need for speed with a tour of the state-of-the-art BMW factory. Tour the carmaker’s cutting-edge plant and learn how it’s manufactured millions of cars. Futuristic and antiquated, it’s the best of both worlds in Regensburg.

Other Excursions:

People have been describing Regensburg as “old and new” for a thousand years. A single structure perfectly illustrates this: Porta Praetoria, the gate built by the Romans during Marcus Aurelius’s reign. The gate and adjacent watchtower have been incorporated into a much newer building, but the plaster has been removed to reveal the ancient stones laid so long ago. As you walk through the cobbled lanes of the UNESCO-designated Old Town, the city’s 2,000-year history is similarly revealed: the Stone Bridge that made Regensburg a 12th-century trading powerhouse, the Gothic town hall where the Imperial Diet met for three centuries, the 13th-century fortified patrician houses, and the spectacular Cathedral of St. Peter, whose magnificent 14th-century stained-glass windows alone are worth your walk. You’ll have free time to explore on your own; it’s very hard to get lost in Regensburg because the spires of the cathedral are visible all over town, so don’t hesitate to roam. The historic quarter not only boasts almost a thousand beautiful old buildings but also many cozy pubs and some great shopping—and the ship is docked conveniently close, so it’s easy to drop your treasures off and go back for more. 

“2,000 Years in One Hour” Regensburg walking discovery tour
or

Here is your opportunity to see German engineering, famous the world over, in operation as you tour the state-of-the-art BMW factory on the outskirts of Regensburg. About a thousand cars a day roll off the assembly line here, many of them in the BMW 3 series. You’ll see various stages of the process, from rolls of sheet metal being stamped out into body parts to watching elements of the car being robotically assembled. Follow an already assembled car into the finishing department to see it painted, polished and have the final touch applied—the BMW roundel.

Note: For safety reasons, BMW does not allow those with pacemakers or insulin pumps to participate in factory tours. The plant is closed on Sundays and holidays, so no visit is possible if the tour lands on those days.

NOTE: If the tour lands on a day when the BMW factory is closed, we will visit the Audi factory instead. The Audi production line is closed on weekends, so if your visit is scheduled for a weekend, you will see the Audi museum instead. 

BMW factory visit
DAY 7 Nuremberg & Roth
Explore Nuremberg's role in German history. Like much of Germany during the World War II era, Nuremberg and its residents faced extreme oppression. To commemorate Germany and its inhabitants’ struggle during that time period, the Documentation Center Nazi Party Rally Grounds museum was erected. The fascinating exhibits provide travelers the unique opportunity to understand and unravel Nazi Germany.

Featured Excursions:
  • Hitler considered Nuremberg the perfect expression of German culture (partly because of its significance in the Holy Roman Empire, which he called the First Reich), and so beginning in 1927, he chose to hold his massive rallies in the city. By 1933, his favorite architect, Albert Speer, had designed the vast Nazi Party Rally Grounds, where thousands upon thousands of Nazi troops saluted Hitler. (Leni Riefenstahl captured these events in her famous propaganda film Triumph of the Will.) Not all of Speer’s plans were executed, and some of his grandiose structures were bombed out of existence, but the remainder stand as vivid testimony to Hitler’s megalomania. A four-square-mile (10-square-kilometer) complex known as Zeppelin Fields contains parade grounds and a huge grandstand, the excavation site where a stadium for 400,000 people was begun—the hole is now filled with water—and the half-finished Congress Hall. Step into Congress Hall, intended to outdo and outlast the Colosseum in Rome, to walk through the Documentation Center and its exhibition “Fascination and Terror,” which covers the causes, the context and the consequences of the National Socialist reign of terror. The second part of this excursion takes you from the Rally Grounds to the Nuremberg Memoriam, dedicated to the Nuremberg trials, where you’ll visit Courtroom 600, the scene of the Nuremberg trials, and an exhibit that discusses the historic trials.

    Note: Courtroom 600 is an active court. Visitors will only be permitted to see the courtroom during trial breaks.

    Nuremberg panoramic city tour with WII rally grounds visit
DAY 8 Bamberg
Bamberg in its entirety is not only described as beautiful, but has often been regarded as one of Germany’s most attractive settlements, with its ravishing architecture, intersecting canals and rivers, and charming stores and restaurants, all framed by rolling hills. Browse antique stores, taste-test smoked beer at a brewery (did we mention it’s the Franconian beer capital?) and marvel at its historic building-lined narrow medieval streets. After you’ve experienced Bamberg’s village life, see it from above with a hike up Michaelsberg Hill, taking in the sights and sounds as you trek through tranquil paths.

Other Excursions:

Now a pleasant city with a lively student population and a world-famous symphony orchestra, Bamberg was the center of economic and political life for a huge swath of Central Europe in the Middle Ages. Spared WWII bombing, the entire heart of historic Bamberg is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The medieval layout of the city remains intact, along with 2,000 historic buildings; it is yours to explore today. In the splendid late- Romanesque Imperial Cathedral you will nd the only papal tomb in Germany, that of Pope Clement II (who was the bishop of Bamberg before he became pope), as well the tomb of Emperor Henry II (who established the bishopric). Near it are two magnificent palaces: The Old Palace, the late-Gothic imperial residence (if you saw the 2011 3-D version of The Three Musketeers, you’ll recognize it immediately), sits across from the New Residence, where the 17th-century prince-bishops lived, separated by a lovely rose garden. Cross the cobblestone footbridge to the Old Town Hall, which is adorned with colorful frescoes, and ramble along the narrow lanes lined with picturesque half-timbered houses. 

Bamberg walking discovery tour
or “Let’s Go” hiking over the hills
DAY 9 Volkach
Your day brings you to Volkach and the heart of the Franconian wine country. It’s a region full of overwhelming natural beauty, rooted communities, marvelous flavors and villages that have been making wine for countless generations. Explore the town and its surrounding countryside, with stops at the breathtaking Main horseshoe bend, the Gothic-styled pilgrimage church of St. Mary of the Assumption and Vogelsburg Castle, where we’ll treat you to stunning views, Franconian Prosecco, regional chocolates and more. If you’re looking for more of an active exploration, cycle, hike or paddle in and around the Main’s river loop.

Featured Excursions:
  • Heart of the Franconian Wine Country: Cycle, Hike or paddle the Main loop
DAY 10 Würzburg, Mainlaende
The opulent Würzburg Residence, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, offers a true sense of the region’s history through the European Renaissance. It even contains the world’s largest ceiling fresco by Tiepolo. Get outdoors and enjoy a scenic hike around Festung Marienberg, a prominent landmark that was previously home to a long line of prince-bishops. If you’re feeling hungry, venture to Hohenlohe Slow Food Academy and awaken your taste buds with a wine and slow food tasting in Weikersheim village.

Other Excursions:
Würzburg Residence and Court Gardens or “Let’s Go” hike to Festung Marienberg
DAY 11 Miltenberg
The perfect German town calls for a day full of quintessential German experiences. Resting on the left bank of the Main, Miltenberg is classically quaint with its charming squares, farmland, biking and pedestrian paths, impressive castles and one of Germany’s oldest inns. It’s so picture-perfect that the historic center of the town has often served as a filming location.

Featured Excursions:
  • Miltenberg Village Day with brewery visit, farm visits, paint and wine class and biking along the Main River
DAY 12 Rüdesheim
Your floating hotel arrives in Rüdesheim, one of the most charming ports of call in the Rhine Valley. This city has a long history going back to Roman times and is famous for the Drosselgasse, a narrow, bustling lane of shops and wine bars, as well as its impressive Niederwald Monument, built to celebrate the re-establishment of the German empire in the late 19th century. You may choose to visit a renowned vineyard or, for a more active jaunt, take a vineyard hike that includes a picnic with the wine made famous by the region.

Other Excursions:
RheinWeinWelt - the best Rhine Rieslings paired with artisanal refined cheeses or Vineyard hike above Rüdesheim
DAY 13 Cologne
Today you get to experience Cologne’s many treasures, including a stroll with a local expert through Old Town to the city’s iconic UNESCO-listed Gothic Cologne Cathedral.

Other Excursions:
Cologne "Do as the Locals Do" or

As you walk through the narrow lanes of the Old Town, you’ll find it hard to believe that more than 70 percent of the city was destroyed by bombs during WWII. Three medieval gates remain standing, as does the old city hall with its Renaissance façade. The famous 12 Romanesque churches were reconstructed from the rubble, and the cathedral, Cologne’s iconic landmark, rises magnificently in the city center. Though it was badly damaged in WWII, the great UNESCO-designated cathedral retains many of its original treasures—the relics of the Magi and other sacred figures, which inspired its building in the 12th century, the 14th-century stained-glass windows that were stored safely throughout the war and the beautifully painted choir stalls—though other treasures are displayed separately. Enter the awe-inspiring nave and learn about the history of the cathedral and its art collections, especially the pieces surrounding the Shrine of the Magi.

Note: The number of visitors allowed in Cologne Cathedral is regulated by a very strict schedule of time slots. Sightseeing will be arranged around the time slots obtained. On Sundays and Catholic holidays, guided tours inside the cathedral are not allowed, but individual visits are still welcomed.

Cologne walking discovery tour with Cologne Cathedral
DAY 14 Amsterdam
Experience the magic and beauty of Amsterdam via a canal cruise, before visiting the Rijksmuseum, home to Rembrandt’s The Night Watch, or strolling through Amsterdam’s canal-lined streets. Holland’s largest city, Amsterdam has been an international port and financial center for 400 years, endowing it with a cosmopolitan flair to match its historic architecture. Here, even the simplest shop has a distinctive charm, and every street has a story to tell. You’re going to want to listen.

Other Excursions:
Amsterdam canals and famous Rijksmuseum or

Uncover some of Amsterdam’s most charming and little-known treasures with a stroll to the city’s most notable sights. Cross over the historic and richly-decorated Blauwbrug (Blue Bridge) that sits over the river Amstel. The original Blue Bridge was a wooden structure built in 1600 and painted to match the blue color from the Dutch flag. Next, board a streetcar and head to Rokin Street for a taste of a traditional Dutch delicacy, Haring (a unique raw herring dish) before pressing on towards Begijnhof–one of the oldest groups of historic buildings in Amsterdam. Next up? The Amsterdam Museum, located in the former city orphanage built in 1580, for an intimate look into the country’s history. After, you’ll head towards Dam Square and visit the Royal Palace of Amsterdam, the only palace in the country that is open to the public and still in use by the Dutch Monarchy. Discover its collection of artwork and furnishings before venturing to the adjacent Nieuwe Kerk, one of the most impressive churches in The Netherlands. Monarchs have been inaugurated there, royal weddings and coronations have taken place under its stained-glass windows, and on occasion exhibitions on art and history are hosted inside. Head into oldest parts of Amsterdam via Warmoesstraat, one of the oldest, shop-lined streets in the city, that is also adjacent to the city's infamous Red-Light District. Wander along charming streets and indulge in a little bit of window shopping before arriving in Oudezijds Voorburgwal, one the city's central canals flanked by quintessentially Dutch façades, where you’ll see the Oude Kerk (translation: Old Church), the city’s oldest building. Your tour will end in Zeedijk, Amsterdam’s Chinatown, which was originally constructed as a means of protection from the sea.

“Do as the Locals Do” Amsterdam walking tour
DAY 15 Amsterdam (Disembark)
Disembark the ship. If your cruise package includes a group departure transfer or if you have purchased a private departure transfer, you will be transferred to Amsterdam Schiphol Airport for your flight home.
Amsterdam to Vienna | 15 Days
Note: The itineraries presented are subject to modification due to water levels, closures because of public holidays or other uncontrollable factors. Every effort will be made to operate programs as planned, but changes may still be necessary throughout the cruise. This day-to-day schedule is subject to change. Your final day-to-day schedule will be provided onboard on the first day of your cruise.

Program offerings are subject to change.
DAY 1 Amsterdam (Embark)
Arrive at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport. If your cruise includes a group arrival transfer or if you have purchased a private arrival transfer, you will be greeted by a Uniworld representative and transferred to the ship.
DAY 2 Amsterdam
Experience the magic and beauty of Amsterdam via a canal cruise, before visiting the Rijksmuseum, home to Rembrandt’s The Night Watch, or strolling through Amsterdam’s canal-lined streets. Holland’s largest city, Amsterdam has been an international port and financial center for 400 years, endowing it with a cosmopolitan flair to match its historic architecture. Here, even the simplest shop has a distinctive charm, and every street has a story to tell. You’re going to want to listen

Other Excursions:
Amsterdam canals and famous Rijksmuseum or

Uncover some of Amsterdam’s most charming and little-known treasures with a stroll to the city’s most notable sights. Cross over the historic and richly-decorated Blauwbrug (Blue Bridge) that sits over the river Amstel. The original Blue Bridge was a wooden structure built in 1600 and painted to match the blue color from the Dutch flag. Next, board a streetcar and head to Rokin Street for a taste of a traditional Dutch delicacy, Haring (a unique raw herring dish) before pressing on towards Begijnhof–one of the oldest groups of historic buildings in Amsterdam. Next up? The Amsterdam Museum, located in the former city orphanage built in 1580, for an intimate look into the country’s history. After, you’ll head towards Dam Square and visit the Royal Palace of Amsterdam, the only palace in the country that is open to the public and still in use by the Dutch Monarchy. Discover its collection of artwork and furnishings before venturing to the adjacent Nieuwe Kerk, one of the most impressive churches in The Netherlands. Monarchs have been inaugurated there, royal weddings and coronations have taken place under its stained-glass windows, and on occasion exhibitions on art and history are hosted inside. Head into oldest parts of Amsterdam via Warmoesstraat, one of the oldest, shop-lined streets in the city, that is also adjacent to the city's infamous Red-Light District. Wander along charming streets and indulge in a little bit of window shopping before arriving in Oudezijds Voorburgwal, one the city's central canals flanked by quintessentially Dutch façades, where you’ll see the Oude Kerk (translation: Old Church), the city’s oldest building. Your tour will end in Zeedijk, Amsterdam’s Chinatown, which was originally constructed as a means of protection from the sea.

“Do as the Locals Do” Amsterdam walking tour
DAY 3 Cologne
Today you get to experience Cologne’s many treasures, including a stroll with a local expert through Old Town to the city’s iconic UNESCO-listed Gothic Cologne Cathedral.

Other Excursions:
Cologne "Do as the Locals Do" or

As you walk through the narrow lanes of the Old Town, you’ll find it hard to believe that more than 70 percent of the city was destroyed by bombs during WWII. Three medieval gates remain standing, as does the old city hall with its Renaissance façade. The famous 12 Romanesque churches were reconstructed from the rubble, and the cathedral, Cologne’s iconic landmark, rises magnificently in the city center. Though it was badly damaged in WWII, the great UNESCO-designated cathedral retains many of its original treasures—the relics of the Magi and other sacred figures, which inspired its building in the 12th century, the 14th-century stained-glass windows that were stored safely throughout the war and the beautifully painted choir stalls—though other treasures are displayed separately. Enter the awe-inspiring nave and learn about the history of the cathedral and its art collections, especially the pieces surrounding the Shrine of the Magi.

Note: The number of visitors allowed in Cologne Cathedral is regulated by a very strict schedule of time slots. Sightseeing will be arranged around the time slots obtained. On Sundays and Catholic holidays, guided tours inside the cathedral are not allowed, but individual visits are still welcomed.

Cologne walking discovery tour with Cologne Cathedral
DAY 4 Rüdesheim
Your floating hotel arrives in Rüdesheim, one of the most charming ports of call in the Rhine Valley. This city has a long history going back to Roman times and is famous for the Drosselgasse, a narrow, bustling lane of shops and wine bars, as well as its impressive Niederwald Monument, built to celebrate the re-establishment of the German empire in the late 19th century. You may choose to visit a renowned vineyard or, for a more active jaunt, take a vineyard hike that includes a picnic with the wine made famous by the region.

Other Excursions:
RheinWeinWelt - the best Rhine Rieslings paired with artisanal refined cheeses or Vineyard hike above Rüdesheim
DAY 5 Miltenberg
The perfect German town calls for a day full of quintessential German experiences. Resting on the left bank of the Main, Miltenberg is classically quaint with its charming squares, farmland, biking and pedestrian paths, impressive castles and one of Germany’s oldest inns. It’s so picture-perfect that the historic center of the town has often served as a filming location.

Featured Excursions:
  • Miltenberg Village Day with brewery visit, farm visits, paint and wine class and biking along the Main River
DAY 6 Würzburg
The opulent Würzburg Residence, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, offers a true sense of the region’s history through the European Renaissance. It even contains the world’s largest ceiling fresco by Tiepolo. Get outdoors and enjoy a scenic hike around Festung Marienberg, a prominent landmark that was previously home to a long line of prince-bishops. If you’re feeling hungry, venture to Hohenlohe Slow Food Academy and awaken your taste buds with a wine and slow food tasting in Weikersheim village.

Other Excursions:
Würzburg Residence and Court Gardens or “Let’s Go” hike to Festung Marienberg
DAY 7 Volkach
Your day brings you to Volkach and the heart of the Franconian wine country. It’s a region full of overwhelming natural beauty, rooted communities, marvelous flavors and villages that have been making wine for countless generations. Explore the town and its surrounding countryside, with stops at the breathtaking Main horseshoe bend, the Gothic-styled pilgrimage church of St. Mary of the Assumption and Vogelsburg Castle, where we’ll treat you to stunning views, Franconian Prosecco, regional chocolates and more. If you’re looking for more of an active exploration, cycle, hike or paddle in and around the Main’s river loop.

Featured Excursions:
  • Heart of the Franconian Wine Country: Cycle, Hike or paddle the Main loop
DAY 8 Bamberg
Bamberg in its entirety is not only described as beautiful, but has often been regarded as one of Germany’s most attractive settlements, with its ravishing architecture, intersecting canals and rivers, and charming stores and restaurants, all framed by rolling hills. Browse antique stores, taste-test smoked beer at a brewery (did we mention it’s the Franconian beer capital?) and marvel at its historic building-lined narrow medieval streets. After you’ve experienced Bamberg’s village life, see it from above with a hike up Michaelsberg Hill, taking in the sights and sounds as you trek through tranquil paths.

Other Excursions:

Now a pleasant city with a lively student population and a world-famous symphony orchestra, Bamberg was the center of economic and political life for a huge swath of Central Europe in the Middle Ages. Spared WWII bombing, the entire heart of historic Bamberg is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The medieval layout of the city remains intact, along with 2,000 historic buildings; it is yours to explore today. In the splendid late- Romanesque Imperial Cathedral you will nd the only papal tomb in Germany, that of Pope Clement II (who was the bishop of Bamberg before he became pope), as well the tomb of Emperor Henry II (who established the bishopric). Near it are two magnificent palaces: The Old Palace, the late-Gothic imperial residence (if you saw the 2011 3-D version of The Three Musketeers, you’ll recognize it immediately), sits across from the New Residence, where the 17th-century prince-bishops lived, separated by a lovely rose garden. Cross the cobblestone footbridge to the Old Town Hall, which is adorned with colorful frescoes, and ramble along the narrow lanes lined with picturesque half-timbered houses. 

Bamberg walking discovery tour
or “Let’s Go” hiking over the hills
DAY 9 Nuremberg & Roth
Start in Nuremberg and explore its role in German history. Like much of Germany during the World War II era, Nuremberg and its residents faced extreme oppression. To commemorate Germany and its inhabitants’ struggle during that time period, the Documentation Center Nazi Party Rally Grounds museum was erected. The fascinating exhibits provide travelers the unique opportunity to understand and unravel Nazi Germany.

Featured Excursions:
  • Hitler considered Nuremberg the perfect expression of German culture (partly because of its significance in the Holy Roman Empire, which he called the First Reich), and so beginning in 1927, he chose to hold his massive rallies in the city. By 1933, his favorite architect, Albert Speer, had designed the vast Nazi Party Rally Grounds, where thousands upon thousands of Nazi troops saluted Hitler. (Leni Riefenstahl captured these events in her famous propaganda film Triumph of the Will.) Not all of Speer’s plans were executed, and some of his grandiose structures were bombed out of existence, but the remainder stand as vivid testimony to Hitler’s megalomania. A four-square-mile (10-square-kilometer) complex known as Zeppelin Fields contains parade grounds and a huge grandstand, the excavation site where a stadium for 400,000 people was begun—the hole is now filled with water—and the half-finished Congress Hall. Step into Congress Hall, intended to outdo and outlast the Colosseum in Rome, to walk through the Documentation Center and its exhibition “Fascination and Terror,” which covers the causes, the context and the consequences of the National Socialist reign of terror. The second part of this excursion takes you from the Rally Grounds to the Nuremberg Memoriam, dedicated to the Nuremberg trials, where you’ll visit Courtroom 600, the scene of the Nuremberg trials, and an exhibit that discusses the historic trials.

    Note: Courtroom 600 is an active court. Visitors will only be permitted to see the courtroom during trial breaks.

    Nuremberg panoramic city tour with WII rally grounds visit
DAY 10 Regensburg
Spend the morning discovering Regensburg’s long line of dukes, kings and bishops that called the former Bavarian capital and Free Imperial City home. Regensburg boasts the largest medieval old town north of the Alps (over 1,500 listed buildings), a prominent skyline, and a large collection of museums, exhibits and theaters. Find your need for speed with a tour of the state-of-the-art BMW factory. Tour the carmaker’s cutting-edge plant and learn how it’s manufactured millions of cars. Futuristic and antiquated, it’s the best of both worlds in Regensburg.

Other Excursions:

People have been describing Regensburg as “old and new” for a thousand years. A single structure perfectly illustrates this: Porta Praetoria, the gate built by the Romans during Marcus Aurelius’s reign. The gate and adjacent watchtower have been incorporated into a much newer building, but the plaster has been removed to reveal the ancient stones laid so long ago. As you walk through the cobbled lanes of the UNESCO-designated Old Town, the city’s 2,000-year history is similarly revealed: the Stone Bridge that made Regensburg a 12th-century trading powerhouse, the Gothic town hall where the Imperial Diet met for three centuries, the 13th-century fortified patrician houses, and the spectacular Cathedral of St. Peter, whose magnificent 14th-century stained-glass windows alone are worth your walk. You’ll have free time to explore on your own; it’s very hard to get lost in Regensburg because the spires of the cathedral are visible all over town, so don’t hesitate to roam. The historic quarter not only boasts almost a thousand beautiful old buildings but also many cozy pubs and some great shopping—and the ship is docked conveniently close, so it’s easy to drop your treasures off and go back for more. 

“2,000 Years in One Hour” Regensburg walking discovery tour
or

Here is your opportunity to see German engineering, famous the world over, in operation as you tour the state-of-the-art BMW factory on the outskirts of Regensburg. About a thousand cars a day roll off the assembly line here, many of them in the BMW 3 series. You’ll see various stages of the process, from rolls of sheet metal being stamped out into body parts to watching elements of the car being robotically assembled. Follow an already assembled car into the finishing department to see it painted, polished and have the final touch applied—the BMW roundel.

Note: For safety reasons, BMW does not allow those with pacemakers or insulin pumps to participate in factory tours. The plant is closed on Sundays and holidays, so no visit is possible if the tour lands on those days.

NOTE: If the tour lands on a day when the BMW factory is closed, we will visit the Audi factory instead. The Audi production line is closed on weekends, so if your visit is scheduled for a weekend, you will see the Audi museum instead. 

BMW factory visit
DAY 11 Passau, Engelhartszell
Arrive in the afternoon in the “City of Three Rivers,” Passau, where medieval lanes, tunnels, cathedrals and archways fuse with modern shopping malls and buildings. Marvel at the Italian baroque-style St. Stephen’s Church, which holds the second largest church pipe organ in the world (way to go, Passau) or set out on a panoramic tour of the city with mini hikes to the best vistas. Your afternoon brings new experiences in the forest-dotted district of Engelhartszell. Experience Bavaria’s great outdoors on a scenic bike ride along the Danube to Engelhartszell.

Featured Excursions:
  • “Let’s Go” Danube bike trail

Other Excursions:

The skyline of Passau is dominated by two buildings that owe their existence to the prince-bishops who ruled the city until 1803: the great fortress looming on a hill above the three rivers, home to the bishops until the 17th century, and the green onion domes of St. Stephan’s Cathedral. As you walk through the cobblestone streets toward those green onion domes, you’ll realize that Passau retains the layout of the medieval town. However, many of the wooden medieval buildings burned to the ground in the 17th century, and the prince-bishops imported Italian artists to build a new cathedral and a grand new residence for the bishops themselves. As a result, these splendid structures aunt Italian baroque and rococo style and ornamentation, complete with opulent gilding and wonderful frescoes. Your guide will introduce you to some of the architectural highlights—the rococo stairways of the New Residence; the cathedral; and the Town Hall, which boasts a magnificent atrium adorned by large paintings by Ferdinand Wagner—and make sure you get a close-up view of the point where the three rivers meet: The waters of each one are a different color. Because it’s built on a peninsula between the Danube and the Inn, the city has flooded often over the centuries; you can see high-water marks on many buildings (2013 saw the worst flooding in 500 years). 

Passau walking discovery tour
or Passau Panoramic tour with mini hikes
DAY 12 Dürnstein
Natural wonders of the Wachau Valley and exquisite food and wine are on the menu for your day in Dürnstein. Meander around the town’s beautiful streets lined with wildly photogenic buildings and restaurants teeming with wine produced on the outskirts of town. You won’t want to miss a sampling of the region’s most acclaimed wines at Austria’s oldest wine estate, Nikolaihof. Join a saffron workshop and get an exclusive look at the making of the spice as precious as gold.

Featured Excursions:
  • Considering its diminutive size, the village of Dürnstein offers much to explore. The famous blue baroque tower of the abbey church is doubtless its best-known landmark, but the ruined castle above the town provides its most romantic tale. There Richard the Lionheart was imprisoned until he was found by his faithful bard, Blondel, and ransom could be raised—or so the legend goes. Walk along the town’s narrow streets, past 16th-, 17th- and 18th-century houses; it’s an up-close look at over 300 years of architecture.

    Dürnstein village stroll

Other Excursions:

And there’s no better way to conclude your village stroll than with a special tasting of organic wines at Nikolaihof, perhaps the oldest winery in Austria. The location itself is fascinating: One may encounter remnants of the first buildings on the site—an ancient Roman fort—and taste wines in a deconsecrated 15th-century chapel. Owned by the Saahs family, Nikolaihof produces some of the world’s best Riesling and Veltliner varietals; in fact, the 1995 Riesling Vinothek, bottled in 2012, actually scored 100 points in The Wine Advocate, the first Austrian wine ever to rank that highly.

Exclusive Nikolaihof wine estate visit with wine tasting
or

Crusaders planted the first saffron crocuses in the Wachau Valley at the end of the 12th century, making saffron a valued crop for 700 years—but it disappeared from the terraced hillsides early in the 20th century. It wasn’t until 2007 that an ecologist found mention of it in an 18th-century document at Melk Abbey’s celebrated library. Bernard Kaar, who spent years researching the history of saffron and still more years cultivating the world’s only bio-dynamically certified saffron, is one of the Wachau’s most important producers. Meet Bernard and his wife, Alexandra, for a fascinating introduction to saffron—the plant, the spice and the cultural traditions— and educate your taste buds with flavorful delicacies as you taste red-wine-and-saffron chocolate and saffron-seasoned jams, vinegars and honey.

Saffron workshop
DAY 13 Vienna
Arrive in Vienna and get ready for a myriad of exclusive-to-Uniworld excursions just waiting to be discovered, such as a “Morning with the Masters” at the Vienna Art History Museum where the doors will open early just for you as you join an art historian for a tour, or a panoramic tour of the city’s Ringstrasse, a circular grand boulevard that surrounds Vienna’s Old Town historic district and famous monuments. The Viennese’s love for music, food, drink and grandiose architecture is abundant and evident everywhere you’ll go. Itching to encounter Vienna in an authentic way? Look no further than its beloved pubs, coffeehouses and wine taverns serving everything from Wiener Schnitzel to apple strudel to Grüner Vetliner wines. If there’s ever been a time to indulge, it’s now.

Featured Excursions:
  • The Habsburgs assembled an astonishing collection of artistic treasures over the centuries, which formed the basis for the works now on display at the Vienna Art History Museum (Kunsthistorisches). The doors open early especially for you as you join an art historian for a tour of some of the masterpieces gathered here: View a unique group of works by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Vermeer’s Allegory of Painting, Raphael’s Madonna in the Meadow, and portraits by Rembrandt, Velazquez, Rubens, Titian, Tintoretto and Van Eyck, among others, in the Picture Gallery. Then move onto the Kuntskammer galleries, where you can see Benvenuto Cellini’s legendary salt cellar (the only gold sculpture he created that has survived to the present day) and hear its remarkable story. Your exclusive tour ends with a reception in the magnificent Cupola Hall, perhaps the architectural highlight of the splendid building.

    Exclusive “Morning with the Masters” at the Vienna Art History Museum

Other Excursions:

Ring Street, the great horseshoe-shaped boulevard lined with many of the city’s major landmarks—Parliament, City Hall, the Vienna State Opera, glorious palaces and museums—is a mere 150 years old, practically an infant for a city of Vienna’s age. It replaced the walls and fortifications that had protected the city for centuries. Its construction was a testament to confidence, forward- thinking and grand urban planning, and it resulted in a 50-year building spree. You’ll pass most of these opulent landmarks on your way to the older section of the city, the area the walls once enclosed. Later, you’ll walk along Kärntner Street, the celebrated pedestrian boulevard that links the State Opera with St. Stephen’s Cathedral, past the elegant shops on the Graben and the Kohlmarkt. The neighborhood offers a lively combination of historic architecture, street performances, shoppers’ delights and true Viennese atmosphere. 

Vienna: Imperial city highlights
or

Year after year, it’s ranked as one of the most livable cities in the world. Experience Vienna as the Viennese do and you will quickly see why—it’s not just because of its beautiful architecture, peerless cultural institutions and epic history. Vienna’s a walkable city, but its public transportation is still excellent. The pleasant parks and open spaces invite outdoor activities. Its cozy coffee houses are the stuff of legend, and so are its pastries and sausage stands. Join an expert local guide for a taste of life as the Viennese live it. Walk along Ring Street, past many of Vienna’s landmark buildings: the Museum of Applied Arts, the baroque-era St. Charles Church, Musikverein (home of the Vienna Philharmonic), the Hofburg, Parliament and City Hall, on your way to Volksgarten, Vienna’s first public park (thanks to Napoleon, who blew up the bastion that had occupied the location), with its roses and fountains. Stroll along the neighboring streets, then take a break at a coffeehouse for a typical Viennese coffee. 

After your break, wander through the narrow lanes of Haarhoff, pausing in Jewish Square, with its tribute to the Austrian Jews who died during the Holocaust, before wending your way to Vienna’s oldest square, Hoher Markt, where one of the city’s quirkiest sights awaits you: At noon a Vienna Secession (as the art nouveau movement was known in Austria) clock features a parade of 12 historical figures, ranging from Marcus Aurelius to Joseph Haydn, marking the hour. While you wait for the clock show to begin, sample a classic Viennese treat, sausage, from a nearby stand. The adventure ends with yet another very typical Viennese activity—taking the subway.

You have leisure time after your tour to explore Vienna on your own. You might wish to visit the Albertina Museum, which houses one million old-master prints and an impressive collection of works by 19th- and 20th-century painters, ranging from Renoir to Rothko. If you’d like to get a little exercise and see a completely different side of Vienna, borrow a bike from the ship and explore Danube Island and Prater Park. (For a wonderful view of the region, ride the Ferris wheel in Prater Park.)

“Do as the Locals Do” Vienna walking tour
or

After your exclusive excursion, “Morning with the Masters,” see Vienna’s spooky side on a particularly mysterious tour of the city. Stroll to Heroes’ Square and solve the riddle of equestrian statues, but not before stopping in at a local café to indulge in a Bellini cocktail. Head to the Imperial Palace to learn about the straying ghosts and hauntings of this famous landmark. See the Roman excavations and structural remains of a former red-light district. Then, make your way to Graben Square and marvel at its Trinity Column, the most symbolic monument in Vienna. Head to St. Stephen’s Cathedral to decipher an encoded inscription and hear about its “magical musical structure.” Pass by the Griechenbeisl, one of the oldest Viennese inns, famous for Augustin–a regular guest and medical miracle during the black plague.

Vienna Mystery Tour
DAY 14 Vienna
Enjoy a full day of leisure in Vienna, with the choice to explore the “City of Waltzes” and dive into its vast artistic and musical legacy. The city is known for its Imperial palaces, famous residents and expansive art collections. See the highlights as you take in Old Town’s art and food, including scrumptious pastries, or discover Viennese history at the World Museum Vienna, renowned for its collection of Habsburg family treasures. Cap your day with an exclusive after-hours visit of Schönbrunn Palace and experience one of Vienna’s most popular tourist attractions after everyone else leaves. The captivating Baroque-style masterpiece reflects 300 years of changing history, styles and Habsburg monarchs. It’s a good thing you have plenty of time.

Featured Excursions:
  • Full day of leisure in Vienna
DAY 15 Vienna (Disembark)
Disembark the ship. If your cruise package includes a group departure transfer or if you have purchased a private departure transfer, you will be transferred to Vienna International Airport for your flight home.
Cruise Start Date Cruise Only Ship
Sun, 26 Apr 2020
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Sun, 24 May 2020
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Sun, 07 Jun 2020
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Sun, 05 Jul 2020
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Sun, 19 Jul 2020
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Sun, 16 Aug 2020
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Sun, 30 Aug 2020
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Sun, 27 Sep 2020
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Sun, 11 Oct 2020
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